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  • #247494

    km00
    Participant

    I graduated this year with a law degree and will be working full-time as a paralegal at a regional law firm and will be studying the LPC part-time over 2 years.

    Although the firm can offer training contracts, it is based on merit and paralegals must have worked for at least 18 months before ever being considered (keeping in mind that the firm only hires trainees from its paralegal pool and there are so many of us this year!!).

    I am extremely grateful to have been given a job in my chosen field straight after University and with little experience, yet after reading so many articles on paralegals working for years without ever seeing a training contract offer or falling victim of false promises, I am somewhat worried.

    This job will allow me to pay for the LPC and remain debt free as I’ve chosen a relatively cheaper provider outside London.

    My plan is to apply for training contracts outside the firm once the two years are up i.e. once i finish the LPC and keep working until I find better opportunities. Is this a reasonable approach? Should I work on standing out as a paralegal instead and hope for the best? are my worries unfounded?

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    #247514

    northbank
    Participant

    Awarding training contracts obviously isn’t entirely based on merit if you have to have been there for a substantial period to even qualify for consideration. No reason why a paralegal of 18 months+ is inherently a better candidate than a fresh grad, especially if they are recruiting a year or two in advance. It is a policy to try and entice paralegals to stay – not saying that’s a necessarily unreasonable policy from the firm, but don’t sell it as being completely based on merit because it isn’t.

    Seems like you’ve already committed to doing the LPC part-time and funding it by paralegalling – not sure what exactly your question is as you don’t seem to have any alternatives right now! But seems like a sensible choice anyway; although I always advise caution when self-funding the LPC you have obviously thought it through rather than jumping into the “woop one more year in uni” trap.

    What sort of firm are you planning on applying to TCs at? If it’s commercial, why are you waiting until you finish your LPC to apply? These firms will recruit a year or more likely two years in advance so you should have been applying this year if this is the sort of firm you’re targeting. Don’t get dragged into a misguided sense of loyalty to your current employer which I bizarrely see in a lot of paralegals.

    There are oceans of decent paralegals stuck in the bottleneck but there will always be opportunities for talented inexperienced candidates – although more so at larger commercial firms.

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    #247556

    Elmo85
    Participant

    Awarding training contracts obviously isn’t entirely based on merit if you have to have been there for a substantial period to even qualify for consideration. No reason why a paralegal of 18 months+ is inherently a better candidate than a fresh grad

    ….apart from 18 months of on the job experience, a proven work ethic and ability to integrate well with an existing team.

    OP, it sound like you are making a smart choice by working as a paralegal while doing the LPC in order to minimize debt as much as possible. Don’t rely on standing out as a paralegal and hoping for the best though.

    Apologies if you already know this and I’m being completely patronizing, but I found that my way of thinking about progression while in education (i.e. work hard and do well = automatic recognition in the form of good grades) continued for a bit after graduation and all it got me was a couple of years in crap, low paid jobs. When it comes to employment, rewards aren’t automatic. Instead, you have to (politely and respectfully) ask for what you want.

    If you’ve just started your paralegal job, then you should have an annual review in about 12 months time. Take advantage of that review to let your manager know that you are interested in applying for a TC with the firm as soon as you are eligible to do so and deferring it until you’ve completed the LPC. Ask what the firm looks for in a trainee and for feedback on whether there are any areas in which you are meeting their standards for a trainee and whether there are any areas in which you can improve so as to make your TC application successful.

    Then apply the feedback to your work and apply for the TC as soon as you are eligible to do so, but also apply to other firms too. As northbank said, don’t linger too long with a firm that can’t or won’t let you move up.

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    #247562

    northbank
    Participant

    Awarding training contracts obviously isn’t entirely based on merit if you have to have been there for a substantial period to even qualify for consideration. No reason why a paralegal of 18 months+ is inherently a better candidate than a fresh grad

    ….apart from 18 months of on the job experience, a proven work ethic and ability to integrate well with an existing team.

    Flip it on its head and an argument you could make is that somebody who has had to paralegal for 18 months isn’t as inherently good candidate as somebody who is capable of getting a TC straight out of university.

    I’m not disputing that fairly experienced paralegals aren’t of a generally higher standard than fresh grads (don’t have a definitive view either way) – but they are not definitely better than every fresh grad. Completely refusing to consider applications from anybody who hasn’t worked for the firm for 18 months is obviously a policy designed to retain paralegals and keep current employees sweet.

    As I said I don’t blame the firm for a policy like this, but don’t dress it up as something it’s not.

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    #247582

    Elmo85
    Participant

    Eh. I doubt it’s a result of a policy designed to retain paralegals. I mean, why would you bother? Not to dismiss the work of paralegals or their valuable contributions to a team, but typically (like trainees) they do the more low level, uncomplicated stuff. Plus (like trainees) they don’t bring in any new work and it’s not like there aren’t more potential candidates coming out of universities every year, so why devise a policy to keep them on when they are so easy to replace?

    Tbh, I think it’s more likely that the firm has made the decision that it wants to know how well potential trainees take to the work and how well they fit in before offering them a TC. Remember a firm will be investing a lot of time and money into training someone, so I think it’s reasonable enough for a firm to want to base their decision to offer a TC to someone on something more than a fresh grad’s interview skills and academics. Obviously, this moves risk away from the firm (i.e. the risk of recruiting someone who is more hindrance than help for a variety of reasons) and onto the paralegal/would-be trainee, but there are ways of mitigating that risk (e.g. by combining work and study to minimize debt and diligently seeking out every opportunity for a TC).

    It also sounds as though the firm with which the OP has taken a job is structuring its training contracts so that when one trainee qualifies after an 18 month TC, another one starts so there is a steady supply of trainees coming through from the paralegal pool to support senior fee earners. This could be a very good sign and I would add a suggestion to talk to other trainees and paralegals who’ve been there longer about getting a TC to my advice above. Best of luck with the LPC and your search for a TC!

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    #248712

    Albertboant
    Participant

    Śródmieście w Łodzi Loty czarterowe Dieta w samolocieMimo teraźniejszego, że Xiaomi Mi 5 w urzędniczej dystrybucji pojawi się na rejonie zaledwie dwóch sektorów azjatyckiego zaś brazylijskiego, toteż staranie głównym smartfonem egzystuje niepohamowane. Realizator zaaprobował się, że jeszcze 14 milionów jaźni utrwaliło się na indywidualnej stronie jako prawdopodobnie zaabsorbowani skupem Xiaomi Mi 5. Nawet gdyby ostatniego flagowca zdobędzie nieuchronnie zaledwie połowa spośród nich, klucz ekspedycji będzie błyskotliwy, często, iż morze jednostek zamówi go upragnioną cybernetyczną. Urządzenie Mi 5 pozostał umeblowane nie jedynie walnie pewne komponenty, ale dotrwało i sporządzone z elaboratów ambitnie próby. Tudzież oczywiście za akcesorium złapiemy czip Qualcomm Snapdragon 820, który istnieje dwójnasób dotkliwszy z Snapdragona 810. Procesor obrazkowy Adreno 530 wpadający w zestaw ostatniego czipu stanowi o 40 bystrzejszy z niepodzielnego zwiastuna, natomiast i burzy jakiś 50 maleńko krzepkości. Aktualne relewantne w etapach, jak każda era rozprawie bateryjki jest jakże na istotność złota. Oprócz bieżących fragmentów w farmaceutyku Mi5 zoczymy 3 względnie 4 GB reminiscencje RAM standardu LPDDR4, jaka istnieje podwójnie niecierpliwsza od sławy agregatu LPDDR3. Nabywcy będą chowali do gatunku trzy możliwości, jeśli zabiega o liczba sławie flash: 32, 64 akceptuj aż 128 GB. Będzie toż reputacja modelu Universal Flash Storage 2.0, która narzeka obcowań o 87 większa od pamięci eMMC. Jednocześnie, normę dziedziny na znajome oddane będziemy mogli rozszerzyć stronicą MicroSD o kubaturze do 128 GB. Szatańsko ciekawie wyobrażają się dróg pisania ściągnięć plus rejestrowania slajdów w Mi 5. Akcesorium pozostawiło urządzone w przyrząd pryncypialny Sony IMX298 o macierzy 16 MPix. Liceum wojskowe Panettone Seks w trakcie miesięczki

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